Name e Format: Caranut’s (French Riviera) – E-liquid 50 ml – received by the manufacturer

Batch: CA190104

Nico: 0 mg/ml

Declared base: 50 PG / 50 VG

Expiry date: 01/2021

Devices: Vaporesso Gen 220W + Steam Crave Aromamizer Lite RTA single fused clapton coil 1,0 ohm (Ni80 30 awg x 2 + Ni80 38 awg) with Cotton Bacon Prime.


A few months ago I spoke for the first time about a liquid from a new French company, French Riviera, known during the last edition of Vapitaly. French Riviera is based in Fréjus on the French Riviera, a few kilometers south of Cannes. The company clearly emphasizes on its institutional site to produce 100% vegetable e-liquids, using not only vegetable glycerol but also vegetable-based propylene glycol; moreover the aromas used to formulate the different recipes of the brand are all natural and come from Grasse, the world capital of perfumes.

Caranut’s is an e-liquid ready to vape with zero nicotine sold in a 50 ml chubby gorilla. It has a nice shiny vintage-style label with all the information about the product and the manufacturer.

We could not find any official description of Caranu’ts on the net; we only know what is shown on the manufacturer’s website and on the bottle label:

Noisettes caramélisées

Caramelized hazelnuts

SMELL TEST

Caranut’s on the smell shows an evident nutty imprint, prevailing on delicate caramelized hints and on a penetrating and vaguely alcoholic background. The general tone, despite the slight alcoholic aura, appears pleasantly natural. The smell test in any case confirms what was already announced in the official description of the product, that is that, in the wide panorama of vape e-liquids , I am in the presence of a relatively simple and rather common recipe.

I rush towards the vape test, relying on the surprising and perhaps slightly underestimated Steam Crave Aromamizer Lite, a rebuildable 23 mm atomizer able to express itself at best with different types of e-liquids and in particular in flavor chasing vape.

VAPE TEST

I start the vaporization test and I notice that the e-liquid has a sweet soul that is immediately revealed during inhalation. A deeply sugary sensation that hides some caramelized notes, which try to emerge with great effort during the puff. The not excessive aromatic load makes it easier to receive this good dose of sweetness during inhalation phase.

The sugary note lets the aromas of hazelnut shell emerge slowly and Caranut’s now becomes slightly drier and more penetrating, showing in the heart of the puff the most classic aromatic nuances of a good dry fruit: slight woodiness and toasting nuances. Unfortunately, however, the flavor of the hazelnut, which I can guess is good and very realistic, is unable to completely shake off the intrusiveness of sucralose, which continues to hover within the aromatic structure of this e-liquid, penalizing the perception of the other bouquet ingredients.

If the hazelnut as mentioned, manages to find its discreet space inside the aromatic plant of Caranut’s, the same cannot be said for the caramel that remains at the edges of the bouquet until the final moments of the vape, when in exhalation it seems to succeed in alongside the hazelnut scents.

The hazelnut caramelization effect does not, in my point of view, showed how should be, because the contribution of caramel to the recipe is so timid and haggard. It is the sugar (not caramelized) that in Caranut’s holds the bench thanks to its extremely covering presence with respect to the other components of the mix. If on the one hand the hazelnut is able to emerge moderately thanks to its penetrating and decisive characteristics, on the other hand this does not happen for the notoriously more delicately aromatic caramel.

Caranut’s is ultimately a pleasant e-juice with good cues and made with quality raw materials but, alas, suffers from the cumbersome presence of the sugar component that dulls more than due caramel and to a lesser extent hazelnut in almost all stages of vape.

Pro: Quality raw materials that make the recipe realistic and natural.

Cons: The sweetening element (sucralose) covers too much the main ingredients of the recipe.